public health TV

Dr. Jackie On The Difference Between Measles and Rash

The Difference Between Measles and Rash

The measles outbreak has a lot of people talking and it’s raised a lot of questions about our children’s health.

Dr. Jackie on the Difference Between Measles and Rash
Dr. Jackie on the Difference Between Measles and Rash

In this NBC4 videoDr. Jackie Eghrari-Sabet, of Family ENT, Allergy & Asthma Center in Gaithersburg, Maryland, explains how you can tell the difference between a child’s rash and measles, and answers some of our questions:

  1. How easy is it to confuse measles with rash or something else?
  2. What are the long-term effects of this potentially fatal virus?
  3. With measles spreading like it is, aren’t babies that are not to be vaccinated until they’re at least a year old at much higher risk now?
  4. How risky is some parents’ choice to “delay” vaccinations?
  5. Should a woman who gets the vaccine “wait” to get pregnant?
  6. Who, for medical reasons, should NOT get the vaccine?

How to protect your child from measles

How to protect your child from measles
How to protect your child from measles
asthma TV

Dr. Jackie: Who’s at Risk for Asthma

Who’s at Risk for Asthma

In this NBC4 video, Dr. Jackie Eghrari-Sabet, of Family ENT, Allergy & Asthma Center in Gaithersburg, Maryland, tells us who’s at higher risk of asthma and how budget cuts in Maryland affect those who suffer from it.

Are the Maryland budget cut short sighted? Does your zip code matter? Dr. Jackie refers to a Johns Hopkins asthma study, showing that race, ethnicity and income are the biggest risk factors for asthma.

Asthma in inner city linked to demographics, not urban factors

Who's at Risk for Asthma: Demographics plays role in asthma prevalence in the United States
Who’s at Risk for Asthma: Demographics plays role in asthma prevalence in the United States

High asthma incidence in inner-city areas may be due to demographic factors rather than living in urban neighborhoods, according to study findings in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

Researchers analyzed data from the 2009-2011 National Health Interview Survey, the US Census and the National Center for Health Statistics for 23,065 children aged 6 to 17 years.

“Current asthma prevalence was significantly higher among blacks (17.1%) and Puerto Ricans (19.8%), compared with whites (9.6%), Hispanics (8.8%) and Asians (8.1%).”

“Black race and Puerto Rican ethnicity remained strong independent predictors of current asthma, even when neighborhood-level poverty, urban/rural status, region, sex, age and birth in the United States were included in the model.”

public health TV

Dr. Jackie: Debunking Cold Weather Myths

Dr. Jackie: Debunking Cold Weather Myths

Do you really know the tricks to stay healthy in the cold days ahead of us? Dr. Jackie explains three popular cold weather myths as the coldest weather of the season approaches.

Dr. Jackie: Debunking Cold Weather Myths
Dr. Jackie: Debunking Cold Weather Myths

 

Should you be wearing a hat on your head if it is only 10% of your body? Instead, keep your feet warm!

Would a warm scarf keep you warm? Not really, particularly if you are a runner, unless it is a neoprene scarf!

Is Vitamin C a must when you are cold? Make sure you have a healthy diet to boost your immune system!

 

allergy TV

Dr. Jackie: Staying Healthy During the Holidays

Dr. Jackie Shares Tips For Staying Healthy During the Holidays

The holidays mean fun, festivities and food. But all the decorating, traveling and eating can be hard on your health.

In this NBC4 videoDr. Jackie Eghrari-Sabet, of Family ENT, Allergy & Asthma Center in Gaithersburg, Maryland, shares some tips for staying healthy during the holidays and talks about:

  • Medicating before decorating for an allergy free holiday;
  • Chestnuts roasting on an open fire and other holiday allergy hazards
  • How to survive allergy free holiday at the cat lady house
Dr. Jackie: Staying Healthy During the Holidays
Dr. Jackie: Staying Healthy During the Holidays

Follow Dr. Jackie’s advise and stay allergy free throughout the holidays!

allergy

Dr. Jackie on Halloween Dangers

If your child has food allergies, Halloween can be tricky. Dr. Jackie Eghrari-Sabet, of Family ENT, Allergy & Asthma Center in Gaithersburg, Md. has Halloween safety tips to keep your family happy and healthy.

1 in every 13 kids has food allergy — many will figure that out for the first time on Oct 31st when they bite into a candy bar. In this informative NBC4 video, Dr. Jackie talks about several pertinent questions:

  1. Does every one have to worry and how do you know if your infants, toddlers, or older kids have food allergy?
  2. If you are at risk — what to do as you go door to door? What are the new “teal” pumpkin we may see this Halloween?
  3. What about eating things that say “MAY contain nuts” or processed in factory with nuts — can you eat them?
  4. What to do if you child is having a reaction ?
  5. Overall tips to keep your food allergic child safe with a simple SAFE rule to follow:
  • Stay in a group when trick-or-treating through neighborhood streets.
  • Avoid eating candy you’re not familiar with and carry hand wipes in case of accidental exposure.
  • Feel free to say “no thank you” to treats you are allergic to.
  • Epinephrine, cell phone and emergency contact should always be carried in case of an allergic reaction
allergy TV

Dr. Jackie on Fox News: Late spring causing severe allergies

Dr. Jackie on Fox News: Late spring causing severe allergies

NEW YORK (MYFOXNY) – It’s spring allergy season…

And the pollen combined with the air quality where you live can be the cause behind your suffering.

Cooler temperatures delayed spring allergies in parts of the country.

Doctor Jackie Eghrari-Sabet, an allergy / immunology specialist, says if you start with the west and the drought, certainly those dry and hot winds will make your allergies worse because what’s in the air can travel further and faster.

“Then as you come across the country to the Midwest or certainly now in the east where we’ve had this unbelievable amount of rain the problem here again can be it washes away the pollen but the molds are going to be incredible” she said.

Cooler temperatures delayed spring allergies in parts of the country.

Dr. Eghrari believes this delay could end up having many suffering all summer long.

“Because we’ve had the late onset of the spring and what we don’t know is what’s the weather going to be in terms of blooming of other pollens like weeds” she said. “ We could certainly have this parade of one leading into the other that the tree pollen leads to the grass pollen leads to the ragweed. And you can have a stuffy nose through every single month of the whole spring and summer.”

The FDA recently approved two new pills to help grass and ragweed allergy sufferers.

Doctors say if you know you are allergic to ragweed, the time to address it is now.

Dr. Eghrari says the reason you want to know about that now is you need to start the therapy for that about four months before hand. And that would be now in many parts of the country.