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The Sweaty Facts: Heat and Your Health

The Sweaty Facts: Heat and Your Health

In this NBC4 videoDr. Jackie Eghrari-Sabet, an allergy doctor with Family Allergy & Asthma Care in Gaithersburg, Md., has the sweaty facts about heat and health.

Thankfully, the heat wave has finally broken and we’re cooling off — for the moment. However, since summer’s far from over, it pays to know how to stay healthy in the heat.

First off, did you know all that sweating really isn’t good for you? “People think heavy sweating gets rid of the body’s toxins. Really, your kidney and liver get rid of toxins,” said Dr. Jackie Eghrari-Sabet of Family Allergy & Asthma Care inGaithersburg, Md. “Be sure you stay hydrated so your internal organs can do their job.”

Not only that, but contrary to popular belief, you can’t sweat off fat, said Dr. Jackie. And if you’re diabetic, you may not be able to sweat properly. “Diabetics seem to plateau with their sweat and hence can’t cool the body,” she said.

Here are a few other sweaty facts: When the heat index (heat/humidity combo) is high, sweat evaporates more slowly, so you have a tougher time cooling off. Plus, hot humid air can trigger asthma symptoms. “Wet weather encourages the growth of mold spores, which are another asthma trigger,” she said.

Also, some studies suggest there could be a link between thunderstorms and asthma attacks. Meteorologists and epidemiologists have studied weather patterns and records of emergency room visits. One such study found an increase in the numbers of patients suffering asthma attacks in the days after a thunderstorm. The theory is that rain breaks up pollen grains, releasing allergens, while high winds scatter the particles and other irritants.

So keep that inhaler close by during the hot days of summer; but whatever you do… “Don’t keep it in your car’s glove box,” said Dr. Jackie. “They’ve been known to explode in the heat.”

Article by Pat Lawson Muse.

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